By Hudson Family Dental PC
March 13, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

The arrival of spring often serves as inspiration to clean house and create an environment that’s bright and fresh. Here at the dental office, we can do the same for your mouth as well! Having clean teeth, healthy gums and fresh breath helps you look and feel your best. Here are some ways we can help you freshen up your smile:

Dental Exam. The best place to start is with a dental exam. Finding and treating tooth decay in its earliest stages will help you avoid more costly and invasive dental treatments later on. It could even save a tooth that might otherwise be lost! Plus, oral cancer screenings are important for everyone—even young, non-smokers. Regular dental exams also give you a chance to bring up any issues you may be concerned about, and to ask for pointers on hygiene.

Professional Cleaning. Having a good oral hygiene routine at home goes a long way towards keeping your mouth healthy. But routine professional cleanings are still very important. Your dental hygienist uses specially designed tools to reach into places where your brush and floss can’t, and remove disease-causing dental plaque and tartar. A polishing provides the finishing touch for a squeaky-clean feeling.

Teeth Whitening. Teeth tend to get duller with age; that’s why teeth whitening treatments can give you a more youthful appearance. Bleaching your teeth is safest when supervised by a dental professional. We recommend two methods: either a professional treatment at the dental office, or a take-home kit we can provide, which includes custom-fitted bleaching trays. The first way will give you the fastest results, while the second is more economical.

Smile Makeover. Sometimes whitening alone is not enough to fix what’s keeping you from flashing a big, bright smile. For example, maybe your teeth aren’t straight, or they have been worn down over the years. Perhaps a tooth is chipped or is missing entirely. Or maybe there are multiple cosmetic issues. If this is the case, we can help you figure out what’s really bothering you about your teeth and how you can achieve the smile of your dreams.

If you have questions about oral hygiene or cosmetic dentistry, please contact us or schedule a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Daily Oral Hygiene.”

By Hudson Family Dental PC
February 26, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: celebrity smiles   teething  

In February, the American Dental Association sponsors Children’s Dental Health Month to raise awareness about the importance of good oral health for kids of all ages. It’s a great time to focus on concerns unique to children—teething, for example. This stage of development can be stressful for children and parents alike. Just ask tennis legend (and new mom) Serena Williams. When her baby daughter recently began teething, the Olympic gold medalist and multi-Grand-Slam champion asked her instagram followers for help:

“Teething… is so hard. Poor Alexis Olympia has been so uncomfortable. She cried so much… I almost need my mom to come and hold me to sleep cause I’m so stressed. Help? Anyone?”

We certainly sympathize with Serena’s plight. The process of teething—where a child’s primary teeth start to emerge (erupt) from below the gum line—can make both baby and parents irritable in the daytime and sleepless at night. While a few infants are born with tiny teeth already showing, most kids’ teeth begin emerging at age 4-7 months.

Teething is an important milestone in baby’s growth…but it’s one that’s not always cause for celebration. It can lead to pain, drooling, gnawing, and biting; ear rubbing and gum swelling; decreased appetite and disrupted sleeping patterns. And did we mention that irritability and stress are common as well? But if you notice fever, diarrhea, or widespread rash, it may be wise to consult your dentist or pediatrician.

What can you do to ease the discomfort of teething? The American Dental Association (ADA) has a few recommendations: Try soothing the gums by rubbing them gently with a clean finger or a cool, moist towel or washcloth; or let your baby chew on a cold (but not frozen) teething ring or pacifier.

If your pediatrician recommends it, over-the-counter medications like acetaminophen or ibuprofen can be used for persistent teething pain—but make sure to use the correct dosage and wait the proper amount of time between doses.

There are also a few things you should NEVER do. Don’t give alcohol to a baby in any form, and don’t rub any medications on baby’s gums. Don’t give a baby anything to chew on that’s unsafe (bones, breakable items, etc). And don’t use teething gels containing benzociane, lidocaine or certain homeopathic ingredients: According to a recent FDA warning, they may pose a danger to infants, including risks of rare but serious medical conditions. Feel free to check with us if you are not sure whether a particular remedy is safe for your baby.

There’s no doubt that teething can be stressful. But it’s a sign of normal development—and in time it will pass…like babyhood itself. If you’re concerned about your child’s teething or would like more information, please contact us or schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teething Troubles.”

By Hudson Family Dental PC
February 18, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

It’s a common sight to see someone wearing braces—and not just teens or pre-teens. In the last few decades, people in their adult years (even late in life) are transforming their smiles through orthodontics.

If you’re an adult considering treatment to straighten your teeth, this particular dental specialty might be an unfamiliar world to you. Here are 3 things you may not know about orthodontics.

Orthodontic treatment cooperates with nature. There would be no orthodontics if teeth couldn’t move naturally. Teeth are actually held in place by an elastic tissue called the periodontal ligament that lies between the teeth and bone. Small fibers from the ligament tightly attach to the teeth on one side and to the bone on the other. Although it feels like the teeth are rigidly in place, the ligament allows for micro-movements in response to changes in the mouth. One such change is the force applied by orthodontic appliances like braces, which causes the bone to remodel in the direction of the desired position.

Treatment achieves more than an attractive smile. While turning your misaligned teeth into a beautiful, confident smile is an obvious benefit, it isn’t the only one. Teeth in proper positions function better during chewing and eating, which can impact digestion and other aspects of health. Misaligned teeth are also more difficult to keep clean of bacterial plaque, so straightening them could help reduce your risk of tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease.

Possible complications can be overcome. Some problems can develop while wearing braces. Too much applied force could lead to the roots dissolving (root resorption), which could make a tooth shorter and endanger its viability. Braces can also contribute to a loss of calcium in small areas of tooth enamel, which can make the teeth more vulnerable to oral acid attack. However, both these scenarios can be anticipated: the orthodontist will watch for and monitor signs of root resorption and adjust the tension on the braces accordingly; and diligent oral hygiene plus regular dental cleanings will help prevent damage to the tooth enamel.

If you’re dreaming of a straighter and healthier smile, see us for a full examination. We’ll then be able to discuss with you your options for transforming your smile and your life.

If you would like more information on orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor article “Moving Teeth with Orthodontics.”

By Hudson Family Dental PC
February 03, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  

When it comes to replacing a missing tooth, you have several options, including a removable partial denture or a fixed bridge. But the premier choice is “the new kid on the block” at just over thirty years old: dental implants. Implants are by far the most popular tooth replacement choice among both patients and dentists.

But they also happen to be the most expensive option, at least initially. So the question is, why invest in dental implants over less costly choices?

Here are 3 reasons why implants could be well worth their price.

More Like a real tooth than other restorations. Implants can match the life-like appearance of any other replacement choice, often utilizing the same types of materials. But where they really excel is in function—how they perform while biting and chewing. This is because the dental implant’s titanium post imbedded in the jawbone replaces the tooth root. No other dental restoration can do that—or perform better when comparing the resulting functionality.

Best long-term solution. As we mentioned before, the initial implant cost is typically higher than either dentures or bridges. But you should also consider their durability compared to other choices. It could be potentially much longer—possibly decades. This is because the titanium post creates an ultra-strong hold in the jawbone as bone cells naturally grow and adhere to this particular metal. The resulting hold can withstand the daily forces generated during eating and chewing. With proper care they might even last a lifetime, and actually cost you less in the long run over other choices.

Adaptable to other types of restoration. Implants have greater uses other than as individual tooth replacements. A few strategically placed implants can also be used to support removable dentures or a fixed bridge for multiple teeth or an entire dental arch. As the technology continues to advance, implants are helping to make other restoration options stronger, more stable and longer lasting—and adding more value to your investment.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants 101.”

By Hudson Family Dental PC
January 19, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cleft lip  

Oral and facial clefts are among the most common and heartbreaking of birth defects. Clefts make feeding or even breathing difficult and can affect speech development.

But there's one other profound effect: an “abnormal” face caused by a cleft can have devastating consequences for a person's self-image and social relationships.

About 1 in 700 U.S. babies are born with some type of visible gap or “cleft.” It can occur in their upper lip, soft and hard palate, nose or occasionally extending to the cheek or eye region. We typically classify clefts as “unilateral” (affecting only one side of the face) or “bilateral” (affecting both sides).  We're not completely sure on the root causes, but research so far has uncovered links with the mother's possible exposure to toxic substances, nutrient or vitamin deficiencies, or infections during fetal development.

Taking steps during pregnancy to minimize these exposures is certainly helpful. But what can be done for children born with a cleft?

A great deal, thanks to the development of surgical repair techniques over the last century. The surgical approach relies on the fact that the tissues required to repair the cleft already exist. They're simply distorted by the cleft break.

Even so, the road to restoration is a long and arduous one. Lip repairs usually take place at 3-6 months of age; palate (roof of the mouth) clefts are undertaken at 6-12 months. As the child's jaw and mouth structure develops, further surgeries may be needed to match earlier repairs with development.

Cleft repairs also require a team of specialists including a maxillofacial (oral) surgeon, orthodontist and general dentist. The latter plays an important role during the process, ensuring the child maintains good dental health through prevention and treatment of disease and dental work for at risk teeth.

The road to a normal life is difficult — but well worth it. A repaired cleft vastly improves a child's health and well-being. Moreover, it restores to them something the rest of us might take for granted — a normal face and smile.

If you would like more information on cleft defects and how to treat them, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

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